The Lies of Locke Lamora Read Along Part II

My little lion, Tanuki, makes a great pillow while I read.

You all had a great week. I know, because you had this awesome book to read.

For this week’s installment, which covers Chapter 3 through the end of Interlude: The Boy Who Cried for a Corpse, we have some insightful questions for you. My answers follow at the end, and don’t forget to check out all the other participating blogs below and see what their answers are.

Using twitter? See our snarky comments under #lynchmob.

And for Scott Lynch behind the scenes info, visit his latest livejournal post HERE.

1) Do you think Locke can pull off his scheme of playing a Midnighter who is working with Don Salvara to capture the Thorn of Camorr? I mean, he is now playing two roles in this game – and thank goodness for that costume room the Gentlemen Bastards have!

2) Are you digging the detail the author has put into the alcoholic drinks in this story?

3) Who is this mysterious lady Gentlemen Bastard Sabetha and what does she mean to Locke?

4) Are you as creeped out over the use of Wraithstone to create Gentled animals as I am?

5) I got a kick out of child Locke’s first meeting with Capa Barsavi and his daughter Nazca, which was shortly followed up in the story by Barsavi granting adult Locke permission to court his daughter! Where do you think that will lead? Can you see these two together?

6) Capa Barsavi is freaked out over rumors of The Gray King and, in fact, us readers are privy to a gruesome torture scene. The Gray King is knocking garristas off left and right. What do you think that means?

7) In the Interlude: The Boy Who Cried for a Corpse, we learn that Father Chains owes an alchemist a favor, and that favor is a fresh corpse. He sets the boys to figuring out how to provide one, and they can’t ‘create’ the corpse themselves. How did you like Locke’s solution to this conundrum?

Little Red Reviewer

MyAwfulReviews

Ashley at SF Signal

Darkcargo Explorer

Nashville Bookworm
Rose’s Thingamajig
Tethyan Books
Kaitharshayr’s Musings
Paperless Reading
Scruffy Fiction

All I Am: A Redhead
Lynn’s Book Blog
Numbers, Words and Ramblings
Booky Pony

Books Without Any Pictures

Just Book Reading

Felix Pearce

Coffee Cookies and Chili Peppers
Beware of the Froggies
Lisa Pizza / A Blog thinger

Realbooks4Ever
Genkinahito’s

the Hugo Endurance Project

1) Do you think Locke can pull off his scheme of playing a Midnighter who is working with Don Salvara to capture the Thorn of Camorr? I mean, he is now playing two roles in this game – and thank goodness for that costume room the Gentlemen Bastards have!

He’s using his face for both roles – granted with makeup and attitudes. But I worry that will come back to bite him in the ass.

2) Are you digging the detail the author has put into the alcoholic drinks in this story?

I love the detail of the food and drinks in this book. The Gentlemen Bastards cook, eat, and drink well!

3) Who is this mysterious lady Gentlemen Bastard Sabetha and what does she mean to Locke?

I wonder where, and why, she went off to. What was her specialty in this little group… hmmm…..

4) Are you as creeped out over the use of Wraithstone to create Gentled animals as I am?

I work with goats and donkeys every day and sometimes I wish they were a little gentled (but only after taking horns or donkey teeth in an uncomfortable place). It’s the little, creepy things like this that makes this story so enjoyable.

5) I got a kick out of child Locke’s first meeting with Capa Barsavi and his daughter Nazca, which was shortly followed up in the story by Barsavi granting adult Locke permission to court his daughter! Where do you think that will lead? Can you see these two together?

It’s Nazca’s footwear that makes her so attractive. Yet it also raises my concern for Locke’s safety should these two be in a locked room, alone, together.

6) Capa Barsavi is freaked out over rumors of The Gray King and, in fact, us readers are privy to a gruesome torture scene. The Gray King is knocking garristas off left and right. What do you think that means?

Looks like there is some sort of blood war coming. The Gray King could be one of the still remaining garristas, or a total outsider…..

7) In the Interlude: The Boy Who Cried for a Corpse, we learn that Father Chains owes an alchemist a favor, and that favor is a fresh corpse. He sets the boys to figuring out how to provide one, and they can’t ‘create’ the corpse themselves. How did you like Locke’s solution to this conundrum?

Well, now we know that Locke won’t back on public displays of tears if it gets the job done. The air of priesthood opens up so many opportunities. Clever little brat, isn’t he?

About nrlymrtl

DabofDarkness.com; Round Table Farms; WovenHearth.com organic farming; reading scifi/fantasy, historical fiction, mysteries; cooking good stuff; weaver

34 thoughts on “The Lies of Locke Lamora Read Along Part II

  1. Pingback: Lies of Locke Lamora read-along, week two! « the Little Red Reviewer

  2. so what is the best way to keep a pack animal from freaking out when there are a lot of people around? I don’t want to give it brain damage, but I don’t want to get kicked in the head either. I’m a city girl, the most experience I have with animals is the petting zoo and seeing mounted police officers at parades. the animals at the petting zoo are cute but lethargic and the cops horses have blinders on.

    The Midnighter thing totally cracks me up. Just goes to show people notice a badge more than they notice your face. Locke’s got a pair of brass ones, that’s for sure, and I ain’t talkin’ about the Sanza twins.

    Ahh, Nacza and her oh so dangerous shoes. No wonder Barsavi suggests Locke as a possible suitor, all the other men in the town are scared of her! They’re good friends, but I don’t think they will make a good couple.

  3. I really don’t think Nacza and Locke would work as a couple – both too secretive – and anyway if they were actually together would Locke then have to divulge the secrets of his Gentlemen Bastards to her. I don’t think she’d be very pleased once she knew that her father had been mugged for all those years!
    I cannot imagine how uncomfortable it must be to walk round in iron shoes – not to mention a bit niffy in summer!!
    Lynn :D

  4. I got the impression that when Locke appeared as a Midnighter, he only did so at night and was keeping to the shadows a bit. That could be my imagination inserting things though.

    • He was definitely using the cover of darkness to help him, not to mention all dressed in black and the fear factor of a Midnighter appearing in your rooms. The bit where they ride off on horse back into the mist being the perfect example.
      Lynn :D

    • Yeah – there was darkness, and brass balls as little red pointed out. I was just curious if Don Salvara will start to compare faces (Fehrwight and Midnighter) since he will be pondering this all night and thinking about the 2 side by side.

      • you can’t help thinking that it would be obvious – or that, even if the disguise is really good, Salvara would have a niggle at the back of his brain, like when you’re trying to place someone out of a film or such like?

  5. Pingback: The Lies of Locke Lamora read-along: week 2 | John Ayliff

  6. I’ve had some little experience handling horses, goats and cows, and Gentling really takes the fun out of the whole business. Besides, having to coax an animal to move, eat and excrete sounds a lot more trouble than have it freak out at a noise or something every once in a while.

    *trying to figure out how to attach knives to combat boots*

      • In From Russia With Love it looked like a sort of long, arrowhead shaped rotating blade on a short rod or pin. The pin secured the butt end of the blade in the toe-end of the sole of the shoe, and the knife rotated around the pin and out through a slit in the side of the sole, stopping when the pointy end was facing forward. I have no idea how it was triggered.

  7. So, how about that torture scene, huh?

    I can honestly say that I don’t remember reading it the first time through the book. Maybe I was just a totally hardcore badass, or maybe I was skimming while being distracted. Either way, don’t remember my feelings on the first read through. The second time, however, I took some time to think about glass and my face and a bag, and it wasn’t pretty.

  8. It seems like the Capa is being played really well: his violent reaction to the murders is destabilizing his own organization, so it will collapse far more quickly than if he trusted people. I would think that it was Locke behind the whole thing if it weren’t for the mentions that he and the Bastards are being watched by the bird-thing . . .

  9. Oh man, I mentioned the Nazca’s boots somewhere too, either on my post or in someone else’s comments. Those are pretty cool boots. I was basically in love with her because of the boots, but then when she winked at Locke as she left the room, I got a real strong sense that she has even worse tricks up her sleeves and the boots are as much distraction as anything else (probably useful though).

    Um…can Nazca be a real person please?

    http://hugoenduranceproject.blogspot.com/2012/03/lies-of-locke-lamora-read-along-week-2.html

  10. Ok, I admit. I completely missed Nazca’s boots.
    Now after reading all the comments (and the post), I’m wondering how was that possible – I enjoy good footwear! :)

    But that is one of the greatest pleasures in this read along, I find out so many things I missed or how other people interpreted different situations. I’m actually glad I’m pacing myself with this book. :)

  11. I think this post is going to make some people angry…

    I’m finding it very difficult to get through this book. It’s unclear to me why I’m supposed to like the main character. Honestly, I find him quite deplorable. We learn that in his past he thought so highly of himself that he ended up getting an inn burned down and several people killed. Right, so we learn about the death offering, and it’s a lot of money. But from where I’m at in the book, it seems that Father Chains is actually teaching Locke to do the same things he did as a child, but without getting caught. What? What sort of lesson is that? It’s absurd. Clearly even the thieves in this book (who are supposed to be following this code) can’t even be trusted to do that, as Father Chains basically tells Locke at the end of the second interlude that all the oaths he made to the Capa don’t really mean anything as long as you don’t get caught. That’s the “honor” among thieves. Don’t get caught. Really, that’s not honorable, that’s the opposite of honor.

    Second, Locke is incredibly arrogant. Like so much so. I mean their toast about being smarter than everyone? I’m actually supposed to like a character (or characters) that go around honesty thinking they are smarter than everyone else and treating those who aren’t like dirt. Maybe it’s coming from an academic background, but I’ve been around people who work on their PhD who honestly are smarter than a lot of people, and they don’t go around boasting it, or even think they aren’t. I also have been around a few people who make snide comments trying to make themselves look incredibly smart or just act like they know everything, and those people disgust me. Like Locke disgusts me. To be honest, I’m honestly hoping that he gets caught by the end of the book. His actions and behavior are not ones that should be rewarded, but unfortunately I have this feeling they will be. Part of me just wants to skip to the end to find out, and skip all the tedious set up in the middle just so I can be satisfied about what happens to him. In fact, I think it would be better if he messes things up and one of his friends dies because of it. Not that having that happen when he was a kid really made a difference, but maybe this time it will.

    I’m still a bit behind, as I just finished the second interlude, but if he really is getting ready to woo the Capa’s daughter, it can really only be because he remembers as a child when the Capa said that his successor will likely be his daughter, and he wants to be in control of the entire system. He’s just a user and an abuser (in my opinion) who will do almost anything to get what he wants, and screw the consequences. He’s no hero, and he’s no anti-hero, he’s just a selfish douchebag out for number one, and I just can’t like someone like that.

    Of course, maybe that’s an act as well, and he’s really doing it for a noble reason. I suppose anything is possible, but I sincerely doubt it. But hey, I’ve been wrong before. I’ll try to get through the book to find out, but it’s getting harder and harder every day.

    • As with any good book, I don’t think you have to adore the main character, just find s/he interesting. I had a housemate in college that was raised in a thieving household. Her parents did it and she and her siblings grew up doing it too. I didn’t agree with it, but she had several good traits too. Rarely do we find something that is black and white.
      And keep in mind these are young bravados – most young males have a time in their lives where they believe that they are hot shit.
      Keep going. You might find some of the choices Locke is faced with later in the book to be of interest.

      • I’m trying. It’s just frustrating. And it’s not a matter of adoring the main character, it’s a matter of liking him. Which I don’t. Granted he didn’t choose to be a thief, but he still seems utterly deplorable.

      • I guess I just expect to have SOMETHING in common with the main character of a book, and when I don’t, it’s incredibly hard to push my way through it.

        • Just food for thought – we were all young and stupid once and going from that 20-something idiot to a more mature, interesting person is a journey. I mean, if everyone knew about the cow-underwear story, they might view a certain person in a different light, right?

          • Hey, EVERYONE loved the cow-underwear!

            And hopefully it is just being young and stupid, because so far, there’s nothing I like about him. Even when people are the sense of reason and say, “We should leave before we get caught”, he thinks he’s better than the people who could catch him and he stays (at least for now).

            *grumble*

            I’ve started skimming, it’s getting bad.

  12. Well, I cheated. When I get into a great story like this one I just have to read on to the end. So … I won’t answer any of the “what do you think will happen” questions.

    But I will comment on the others:
    2) I really enjoyed the drinks and dishes. Very inventive. And indicative of how alchemy underlies every aspect of their lives and culture, They use it for EVERYTHING, don’t they. It’s like chemistry, electricity, medicine, horticulture, and who knows how many other arts and sciences all rolled into one.
    4) I am absolutely freaked by the wraithstone. What a fiendish invention.
    5) I also loved Nasca’s boots. I left a couple of replies above re: the shoe-knife in the Bond movie.
    7) Yes the corpse solution was brilliant, and well ‘acted’ too, especially for such a young kid. But I’m as I’m sure you all noticed, Locke was already out-thinking and out-performing most others around him by the time he was five or six years old. Remember how at the beginning of the story he made his own way out of his devastated neighborhood, out of reach of the slavers and into the Thief-maker’s crew as little more than a toddler?

    Thanks for recommending this book!

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